Trends


Figure 8 Trends in recent use (last year) of amphetamines among young adults (aged 15–34), measured by population surveys (1)

Figure 8

Notes

Data taken from national surveys available in each country. Figures and methodology for each survey can be consulted in the Table GPS-4 in the 2005 statistical bulletin.

For young adults, the EMCDDA uses the range 15–34 years (Denmark and UK from 16, Germany, Estonia (1998) and Hungary from 18). In France the age range was 25–34 in 1992 and 18–39 in 1995.

(1) Sample sizes (respondents) for the 15–34 age group for each country and year are presented in Table GPS-4 in the 2005 statistical bulletin.

Sources: Reitox national reports (2004), taken from population surveys, reports or scientific articles. See also Table GPS-0 in the 2005 statistical bulletin.

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Population surveys show an increase in recent use of amphetamine (Figure 8) and ecstasy (Figure 9) among young adults in most countries with information for consecutive surveys. For ecstasy, the exceptions are Germany and Greece, where levels have not increased, and the United Kingdom, where use of these drugs has recently stabilised (2002/03), albeit at relatively high levels (Figure 9).

As mentioned above, ecstasy use now exceeds amphetamine use in many countries; however, but this is far from representing a decline in amphetamine use. In most countries able to provide information from consecutive surveys, amphetamine use (recent use among young adults) has, in fact, increased. A notable exception is the United Kingdom, where a substantial decrease in amphetamine use has been observed since 1998. This may explain why, in the United Kingdom, lifetime experience prevalence is high compared with the more moderate levels of recent use recorded. It can be speculated that the decrease in amphetamine use has to some extent been compensated by increases in cocaine and ecstasy use (see Figures 8 and 9).


Figure 9 Trends in recent use (last year) of ecstasy among young adults (aged 15–34), measured by population surveys (1)

Figure 9

Notes

Data taken from national surveys available in each country. Figures and methodology for each survey can be consulted in Table GPS-4 in the 2005 statistical bulletin.

For young adults, the EMCDDA uses the range 15–34 years (Denmark and UK from 16, Germany, Estonia (1998) and Hungary from 18).

(1) Sample sizes (respondents) for the 15–34 age group for each country and year are presented in Table GPS-4 in the 2005 statistical bulletin.

Sources: Reitox national reports (2004), taken from population surveys, reports or scientific articles. See also Table GPS-0 in the 2005 statistical bulletin.

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